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Mockernut hickory and shagbark hickory were modeled only by the Tree Atlas medicine 773 cheap dulcolax online mastercard, and both are projected to increase in suitable habitat medicine 6 year in us order dulcolax 5mg overnight delivery. Ailanthus medications knowledge best dulcolax 5mg, Japanese stiltgrass treatment yeast uti order dulcolax 5mg online, and garlic mustard, which often outcompete native herbs and shrubs in this ecosystem, are expected to do well in warmer temperatures. High Adaptive Capacity A history of fire suppression and timber harvesting has facilitated a shift to more mesic soils and associated hardwood species. Increased fire frequency could help regenerate oak species and restore the understory composition. However, very frequent fires have the potential to kill young seedlings of any species, even those species that have relatively fire-resistant, thick bark as adults. This ecosystem is widely distributed, representative of a range of habitat conditions, and likely to expand on the landscape. American chestnut was historically a dominant canopy tree but now cannot grow past sapling size due to chestnut blight. Blight-resistant American chestnut variants are currently under development and experimental planting is already occurring, resulting in increased species diversity in select areas (Jacobs et al. Dependence on periodic inundation, combined with competition from invasive species, may result in a reduced ability of native tree species to tolerate increased disturbances. Negative Potential Impacts Drivers: Potential changes to the precipitation regime could intensify peak streamflow and shift the timing to earlier in the spring. Reduced precipitation in the summer and fall would result in drier conditions, increasing the potential for latesummer drought. An increase in intense precipitation events is likely to result in more frequent flooding. Wildfire, currently episodic and human-caused, could increase under drier conditions, although the extent would be limited by the fragmented nature of riparian and floodplain ecosystems. Dominant Species: Many riverine species in this forest type were modeled only by the Tree Atlas; thus evidence is somewhat limited regarding dominant species. Black willow, green ash, sweetgum, and sycamore are projected to increase in suitable habitat over much of the assessment area. Pin oak, also adequately abundant only in Ohio, is projected to increase and expand into West Virginia, where pin oak swamps currently exist in isolated locations. These species are all tightly linked to moisture availability, and are especially threatened by potentially drier soil conditions. Stressors: Climate change is expected to intensify several key stressors for large stream riparian and floodplain forests. Many invasive plant species currently threaten this ecosystem and are expected to benefit from climate change and outcompete native species. Drought-stressed trees may become more susceptible to insect pests such as emerald ash borer and diseases such as thousand cankers and elm yellows. Interactions among multiple stressors may also lead to more severe climate change impacts. Increases in storm intensity and flooding events have the potential to increase soil erosion and sedimentation, and compound anthropogenic stressors such as agricultural runoff and industrial pollution. The high number of invasive species outcompeting natives has already reduced the adaptive capacity of this ecosystem. Although this ecosystem is highly dependent on disturbance and a regular influx of seeds, nutrients, and water during periodic flooding, increases in flood intensity or more frequent drought may not be tolerated by many species, especially in the early growth stages. Mortality of ash species from emerald ash borer is likely to eliminate this species by mid-century, reducing overall native species diversity. Forests located along river corridors may be buffered from water deficit better than those located farther away on the flood plain, but will be more exposed to flooding effects. Photo by Brian Streets, West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, Natural Heritage Program, used with permission. Suitable habitat for many species is projected to decline, although there is great potential for the complex topography to provide refugia where disjunct populations may persist. Neutral-Negative Potential Impacts Drivers: this ecosystem is adapted to generally wet or mesic sites in the Allegheny Plateau and Allegheny Mountains sections, and is characterized by a high number of tree species. If drought becomes more frequent or widespread in late summer or fall, seedlings and saplings may be at risk of desiccation. Drought would lead to increased risk of wildfire, which this ecosystem would not tolerate well.

Inevitably medications and mothers milk discount dulcolax 5mg without prescription, it became apparent that information descriptive of the whole organism medicine naproxen buy dulcolax 5mg otc, such as radiological data symptoms 9dp5dt dulcolax 5mg on line, other morphometric data medications jfk was on discount 5 mg dulcolax with amex, chemistries, and other health record data should be included. The picture that has come into view is therefore one of a continuum of bioinformatics (Figure C. The Continuum of Bioinformatics is an information system that includes and can correlate information from all of these scales of data. In this model, it may well be possible one day to determine the cost to society of the mutation of a single gene in a single individual! It will also be possible to predict with clarity which drugs will work for which individuals and why. It is in this area that the convergence of nanotechnology and biotechnology will occur, since nanotechnology provides enabling mechanisms for the capture and management of complex biological information, particularly at the level of molecular expression data. Since this is impractical, aggregated information will most likely be used, and this will grow richer over time. Privacy concerns are often raised when highly discrete and potentially predictive personal information is gathered in this way. Tissue Information as a Specific Instance A specific example of the conversion of biological information to digital information occurs at the tissue level. Until recently, it was felt that only a pathologist could interpret the meaning of patterns of cells and other structural components of tissue. This meaning was summed up in the diagnosis that was applied to the tissue and used to guide healthcare decision-making. Over the past two decades, digital imaging of tissues on slides has created the basis for management of tissue information at the image level for ease of data sharing between pathologists and researchers. However, this did not convert the data completely into digital form, because human interpretation and diagnostic assignment of the overall image were still required. This limited the ability to correlate tissue data with other biological information to the level of resolution that diagnosis provided. Converging Technologies for Improving Human Performance 211 Recently, it has become possible to use automated machine vision analysis systems to measure all of the components that can be made visible within a tissue (both structural and functional) with reference to one another. Preparation of tissue information in this way requires two steps: a) automated imaging that enables location of tissue on a microscope slide and the capture of a composite image of the entire tissue - or tissues - on the slide b) the application of image analytic software that has been designed to automatically segregate and co-localize in Cartesian space the visible components of tissue (including molecular probes, if applied) Tissue information captured in this way enables very precise mathematical comparison of tissues to detect change (as in toxicology testing or, ultimately, clinical diagnostics). In each case, substantial work must first be done to collect normative reference data from tissue populations of interest. More importantly, when tissue information is reduced to this level of scale, the data is made available for more precise correlation with other data sets in the continuum of bioinformatics in the following applications: · Backward correlation: "Sorter" of genomic and proteomic data Rationale: When gene or protein expression data are culled from a tissue that has undergone hyperquantitative analysis, tighter correlations are possible between molecular expression patterns and tissue features whose known biological roles help to explain the mechanisms of disease - and therefore may help to identify drug targets more sharply. All components of the tissue that can be made visible are located simultaneously after robotic capture of slide-based images. This step automates the analysis of tissue, putting it immediately into a form that enables sharing of images and derived data. Improving Human Health and Physical Capabilities a diagnosis and may prompt more refined diagnostic classifications. Nanotechnology developments applicable to imaging and computational science will aid and abet these discoveries. Although only several years ago the amount of information that required management would have been a daunting problem, this is far less so today. Extremely large storage capacities in secure and fast computer systems are now commercially available. Several centers are now attempting the development of representative databases of this type. In some cases, the information gleaned will be so complex that new methods of visualization of data will need to be incorporated. This may be the reason why tissue data - classically having its patterns interpreted visually by a pathologist - was the last in the continuum to be reduced to discrete digital form. It will also enable us to better understand the mechanisms of disease, how disease extends throughout the population, and how it may be better treated. All of these beneficial reesults will be accelerated through the application of nanotechnology principles and techniques to the creation and refinement of imaging, computational, and sensing technologies.

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See also Time Contempt symptoms of anxiety cheap dulcolax 5 mg without a prescription, 203 treatment 5th metatarsal avulsion fracture buy dulcolax 5 mg on line, 336­337 symptoms after miscarriage buy dulcolax overnight, 339 medications jejunostomy tube order dulcolax 5mg online, 345, 349 Contract, 26­27, 92, 93 Coppola, Francis Ford, the Conversation, 12­13, 17­19 Copying, 141, 143, 144, 147­148. See also Emulation Corporation, 12­13, 18 Cosby Show, the (television series), 104, 107, 108 Credit, 57, 59 Cross, Amanda, Murder without a Text, 133, 134 Culler, Jonathan, 97 Danto, Arthur C. See also Distance Dewey, John, 23, 26 Difference, 74, 95, 102, 177, 195­196, 250­ 251, 252­253, 308, 317 Disattendability, 337, 349 Disclosure, 231, 232, 233, 234 Disconcertedness, 14, 17, 19, 28, 69, 71, 83 Discontinuity/disjunction, 8, 201, 204, 280­ 281 Disgust: object of, 22, 335, 340; and art, 36; and desire, 332­333, 334, 335, 337, 338, 343­345, 353; in Melville, 333, 337; and sublime, 334; in Kant, 334­335, 347, 348; and disinterest, 335; and subject, 335; and tolerance, 337, 340; and politics, 338­340, 354; and paranoia, 339; and envy, 339, 340; and morality, 339, 340, 346­347; and pluralism, 344, 345; as blocking, 345; centrifugality of, 345; and contempt, 345; in Lispector, 346­348; and reason, 347; in Andrews, 348­349, 350, 352; and surfeit, 353 Disidentification, 196­197, 198, 199, 200­ 201, 203 Disinterest, 42, 86, 87, 267, 269, 270, 271, 335 Disorientation, 14, 237, 242 index. See also Capitalism; Money Ego, 213, 285, 302 Eisenstein, Sergei, 100­101 Elasticity, 100, 101, 117 Eliot, T. See also Affect; Feeling; entries for specific emotions Empathy, 49, 50, 82­83, 85, 112 Empson, William, 41­42 Emulation, 23, 138, 140, 141, 142­143, 144, 148, 152­161, 166, 167 Enervation, 263, 264, 280, 284 Envy: duration of, 7; and feminism, 7, 8, 33, 130, 163; and jealousy, 11, 375n7; and objectivity, 21; proletarianized, 21; and subjectivity, 21; and women, 21, 23, 33, 129, 130, 149­150, 151­152; and inequality, 21, 35, 130; object negation in, 22, 379n43; and identification, 23, 161; and ressentiment, 33, 34, 128; and morality, 34, 130, 340; in Melville, 51; in Freud, 126, 162­163, 164­165; as lack vs. See also Race Euphoria, 29, 43, 45, 48, 61, 246, 266, 284, 285, 286, 288, 292 Everydayness, 230, 231 412. See also Humor/comedy Farrell, Dan, 260, 296, 297; "366, 1996" (poem), 257 Fat Albert (television series), 105, 371n24 Father, 144, 148, 151, 212, 213, 215 Fatigue. See also Paranoia; Phobia Feedback, 60, 68, 69, 71, 72, 75, 76, 79, 80, 81, 84, 88 Feeling: amoral, 6; noncathartic, 6, 9, 10; fake, 38, 39, 40, 51, 71, 78; in Melville, 39, 49, 62­65, 68, 70; as contrived, 40; as attitude, 41, 42; and tone, 43; in Langer, 44­ 45; in Baensch, 45; affective qualities as read by, 47; as significant form, 48; and values/ideas, 48; experienced, 49; fabricated, 49; and reader, 56; as property, 62­ 65, 68; transfer of, 68; semblance of, 68, 71, 76, 81, 83; real and virtual, 69; commodification of, 70; unfelt, 70, 76, 80­81, 83; experienced vs. See also Emotion Felski, Rita, 330; Beyond Feminist Aesthetics, 312 Femaleness, 136, 138, 157, 158, 159, 161, 163. See also Women Feminine, 309, 310, 312, 324 Femininity, 126, 130­131, 149­150, 163 Feminism: and envy, 7, 8, 33, 130, 163; and film criticism, 8, 138­139, 144; and aggression, 33; and politics, 33, 311; and ressentiment, 34; and autonomy vs. See also Women Feuer, Jane, 101, 102 Fiduciary system, 57, 58, 59, 68, 70 Film, 8, 13­14, 99, 109, 122, 133, 134, 138­ 139, 144, 221 Film noir, 13, 14, 17, 28, 30, 78, 216, 298­ 299 Finitude, 271­272, 274, 276, 277 Fisher, Philip, 10, 11, 182, 396n30; Vehement Passions, 6, 188 Focalization, 192, 193­194, 201 Fontanille, Jacques, 153, 246, 284, 393n35 Fordism, 4, 91, 100, 101, 110 Form, 315, 316, 317, 318; significant, 44, 45, 47, 48 Foster, Hal, 343, 344 Foucault, Michel, 106, 309 Fragments, heap of, 287, 288­289, 291 Frank, Adam, 54 Freud, Sigmund: group in, 33, 143­152, 159, 163, 164­165, 168; and Tomkins, 52; and penis envy, 126; gender in, 126, 140, index. Ripley, 170­171 Historicity, 285, 287, 292 History, 286, 288, 292, 293, 294­295 414. See also Society/social relations Honeywood, Varnette, 107 hooks, bell, 135, 137 Horkheimer, Max, 8; "The Culture Industry," 352 Humanism, 308, 309, 310, 314 Humanity, 93, 99, 123, 264 Humanization, 92­93 Humor/comedy, 36, 51, 52, 115, 119, 272­ 273, 276, 278, 281, 282­283, 294, 372n35 Hurd, Earl, 109 Hutchinson, Earl Ofari, 103, 108 Huyssen, Andreas, 342 Hyperactivity, 261 Hyperconnectivity, 321 Ideal, 141, 142, 163 Idealization, 145, 161, 162 Identification: and emulation, 23, 141, 142, 143, 144, 148, 159, 161, 167; and envy, 23, 161; sympathetic, 28, 32, 33, 52; in Melville, 52, 238­239; and desire, 138­139; in Freud, 143­152, 150, 153, 154, 155, 156, 159, 166, 378n29; and copying, 144; and women, 144­151; and ego-molding, 145; phantasmic, 148; in Single White Female, 152, 154, 159, 161, 164; and fantasy, 154; centrifugal vs. See also Self Ideologeme, 7, 35, 92, 95, 128, 205­206, 357n8 Ideology: and tone, 43, 46­47, 48; and affect, 49, 72, 74, 77; in Melville, 61; and feeling, 71­72; in Tomkins, 72; of liveness, 101, 102; and animation, 109­ 110, 111; and irritation, 181; in Larsen, 189, 190, 200, 204; gender, 317. See also Emulation Inclusion, 344, 349, 352 Indifference, 336, 339, 341 Indignation, 338, 340 Inequality, 21, 35, 128, 130 Infection, 149­150, 152, 378n29 Infinite, 271, 272, 274 Ingarden, Roman, 44 Intellectual, 213­215, 216, 236­237, 245, 246­247, 299, 300, 303 Intention, 31, 32 Interjection, 349­350 Interpretation, 215, 221, 222, 226, 227, 228, 229, 232, 234, 235, 236, 246 Irigaray, Luce, 311, 312 Irony, 10, 19, 28, 51­52, 196, 264, 278, 305, 387n33 Irritation: flatness of, 7; and anger, 11; in Larsen, 22, 35, 175, 178, 179, 180­181, 182, 183­188, 189­192, 201, 203, 206, 207, 384n25, 385n32, 387n33; and politics, 27; and Aristotle, 175, 182, 183; as mood vs. See also Envy Jeffersons, the (television series), 107 Johnson, Barbara, 97, 174­175, 183, 199; the Feminist Difference, 8 Jouissance, 332 Kamuf, Peggy, 59 Kansas Nebraska Act, 40 Kant, Immanuel: sublime in, 5, 36, 265­ 267, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 274, 286, 334, 396n30; relativism in, 23; disinterestedness in, 42, 86, 87; Critique of Judgment, 265­267, 269, 334; Observations on the Sentiment of the Beautiful and Sublime, 269, 334­335; and Kierkegaard, 281; disgust in, 334­335, 347, 348 Kдstner, Erich, 29, 43 Kawara, On, One Million Years (Past), 293­ 294 Kazanjian, David, 318 Keaton, Buster, 272, 273, 294, 295 Kierkegaard, Sшren, 129­130, 213­214, 224, 393n35; the Sickness Unto Death, 129­ 130; the Concept of Anxiety, 228; Repetition, 272, 281­282, 283, 295, 296 Kipnis, Laura, "Marx: the Video," 206 Klein, Melanie, 33, 134, 143, 302; "Envy and Gratitude," 162, 163 Knowledge, 301, 302, 318, 325, 330. See also Epistemology; Interpretation Koons, Jeff, 262, 278 Krauss, Rosalind, 100 Kristeva, Julia, 127, 239, 307, 310, 311, 312, 324, 399n8, 400n21; Powers of Horror, 332; Desire in Language, 337­338 Labor, 1, 4, 91, 113, 292, 293­294, 320, 325, 326, 329 Lacan, Jacques, 149, 239, 262, 264, 279­281, 291, 302, 318, 324, 325, 335, 350 Laclau, Ernesto, 161 Langer, Susanne, 44, 45, 47, 71, 77, 84­85, 87, 364n20; Philosophy in a New Key, 6, 45; Feeling and Form, 44 Language: in Melville, 50, 51, 58, 60, 64­68, 237, 238, 239, 242, 243; of Douglass, 96; in Stowe, 97; in Larsen, 176, 179, 202; in Heidegger, 229; temporal order of, 249, 250, 256; in West, 249, 252, 254, 255, 256, 257; formal vs. See also Automatism Media studies, 106, 108 Melancholia, 6, 29, 214 Melley, Timothy, 330 Melville, Herman: "Bartleby, the Scrivener," 1, 10, 12­13, 32, 36, 49, 52, 333­ 334, 337, 349, 353; Moby-Dick, or the Whale, 10, 11, 39, 237, 239, 258, 259; the Confidence-Man, 10, 31, 33, 38­41, 48­52, 55­71, 75­77, 80, 81­86, 88, 93­94, 333, 366n31, 368n48; subjectivity in, 31, 40, 65, 83; feeling in, 39, 49, 62­65, 68, 70; Pierre, or, the Ambiguities, 39, 215, 236­247; emotion in, 40, 50, 52; tone in, 41, 51, 69, 71, 81­82, 84, 238, 366n31; capitalism in, 49, 61­62, 71; language in, 50, 51, 58, 60, 64­68, 237, 238, 239, 242, 243; affect in, 52, 56, 57, 61, 68, 69, 243; agency/agent in, 55, 236, 245, 246; "Benito Cereno," 61; anxiety in, 236, 241, 242, 244, 245, 246­ 247; women in, 236­237, 238, 242, 245, 246, 247; Billy Budd, 239; "I and My Chimney," 239; thrownness in, 242, 244, 245, 246­247 Men/masculinity, 213­215, 217­218, 222, 224, 225, 226, 236, 240, 242, 245, 300, 301, 313, 315, 330 Meta-feeling, 14, 31, 52, 83, 243 Meta-response, 10 Miller, J. Hillis, 166 Miller, William Ian, 333, 335, 336, 337, 338, 339, 341, 352, 353; Anatomy of Disgust, 6 Mimesis, 23, 104, 165, 325. See also Imitation Minstrelsy, 192­195, 201, 372n35, 388n35 Modernism, 177, 178, 179, 313, 348 Modernity, 40, 214, 309­310 Modern Times (Chaplin), 21, 99, 100, 117, 329 Money, 58, 59, 62, 63­64, 65, 68, 366n37. See also Capitalism; Economy Mood, 40, 41­43, 46, 47, 48, 52, 54, 87, 179­ 180, 214, 226, 227, 228, 229, 231 Moore, Pamela, 310 Morality, 6, 10, 34, 130­131, 187, 188, 229, 338, 339, 340, 346­347, 404n18 Mouffe, Chantal, 161 Mouth, 110, 112, 114, 115, 116, 117­118, 122, 123, 125. See also Body Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus, Don Giovanni, 213­214 Mulatta fiction, 179, 188­189, 207­208 Mullen, Harryette, 316 Mulvey, Laura, 138, 221 Murphy, Eddie, 103, 373n40 Mushy masses, 277, 282, 289, 290, 295, 296 Music, 6, 45, 197, 198­199, 200­201, 203, 364n20 Narrative, 25, 26, 42, 50, 51, 65­66, 201, 202, 277, 296 Nature, 88, 93, 265, 266, 267 Neame, Ronald, the Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, 138 Negativity: and ugly feelings, 11­12; in Hitchcock, 226, 245, 246; in Heidegger, 229, 236, 246; in Melville, 238, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246; and Kantian sublime, 266; and sublime, 267; and Jameson, 285, 286, 287; in Single White Female, 379n38 Nervousness, 33, 180. See also Irritation New Critics, 6, 28, 29, 41, 43, 363n15 Nietzsche, Friedrich, 92­93; On the Genealogy of Morals, 33­34, 92­93, 336­337, 361n38 Noлl, Bernard, 338, 340 Noise, 38, 50, 51, 68, 71­72, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 84, 283, 349 Noncatharsis, 6, 9, 10 North, Michael, 177 index. See also Subjective-objective problematic Oedipal phase, 140 Offishness, 174, 175, 188, 189, 385n32 Oldenburg, Claes, 295 Oneness, 153, 157, 158, 159 Onomatopoeia, 349 Other, 99, 152­161, 210 Panic, 39, 68, 70, 71 Paranoia: duration of, 7; in film noir, 13, 28, 30; in the Conversation, 17, 18; and subjective-objective oscillation, 19, 20­21; in Freud, 212, 300­301, 390n11; defined, 299; and theory, 299, 301; and fear, 299, 302, 398n3; and feminism, 300­302, 303, 317­318; female jealous, 301; and system, 301; and knowledge, 301, 302, 318, 325, 330; male, 301, 303; and capitalism, 302; and emotion, 302; and subject formation, 302; and bad timing, 314; in Lacan, 318, 325; in Spahr, 319, 320, 321, 328, 331; hyperconnectivity of, 321; and subjectobject relation, 335; and disgust, 339; and Larsen, 381n5 Parody, 143 Passion, 91, 96, 188, 189 Passivity, 3, 12, 18, 129, 328­329, 337 Patriarchy, 33, 239, 240, 244, 301 Paulin, Scott, 139, 141, 142, 152, 159, 160 Penis envy, 126 Perception, 47, 71, 83 Permutation, 36, 262, 263 Persecution, 162, 163, 302, 380n45. See also AfricanAmericans; Asian-American; Asianness; Blackness Rachman, Stephen, 214 Ravel, Maurice, 48 Reason, 266, 270, 310, 313, 347, 396n30 Rebecca (Hitchcock), 138 Redoubling, 71, 86, 116, 117­119, 221, 222, 224, 245 Reflexivity, 55, 64, 71­72, 73, 81­83 Repetition: and stuplimity, 9, 36; in Melville, 50, 51, 65, 68, 76; and Stein, 54, 251, 253, 262, 283, 293; in Tomkins, 54­55; in Massumi, 79; in Beckett, 255, 262; in Sade, 262; in Lacan, 262, 280­281; and tedium, 263; and finitude, 271­272; of language, 271­272; kinds of, 281; in Kierkegaard, 281, 282; in Deleuze, 283; in Ward, 305; in Spahr, 323. See also Echolalia Repression, 178, 183, 187, 200, 201, 208, 333, 340 Repugnance, 333, 346, 352 Repulsion, 333, 334, 335, 338, 343. See also Identity Self-distanciation, 226 Self-referentiality, 259­260 Self-sufficiency, 267 Semiotics, 24­25, 41, 239, 291, 312 Sentimental literature, 10, 28, 39, 179, 188­ 189, 358n13 Serenity, 269 Serres, Michel, 51 Sexism, 179, 315. See also Feminism Sexuality, 126, 128, 140, 176, 179, 211, 295, 317, 320, 321, 327, 337, 382n12 Shakespeare, William, 11 Shock, 36, 254, 261­262, 263, 268, 269, 271, 281, 284, 292 Sign, 45, 254, 255, 350­351 Significance, 45­46 Significant form, 44, 45, 48 Signification, 45, 233, 305 Simpsons, the (television series), 108 Single White Female (Schroeder), 130­132, 135­136, 138­139, 140, 141­142, 143, 151, 152­162, 163, 164, 165, 166­168 Situatedness, 43, 48 Slasher film, 263 Slash system, 109­110, 113 Slavery, 57, 61, 71 Smith, Adam, 335­336 Smith, Paul, 328, 331 Society/social relations: and emotion, 25, 26, 359n28; and tone, 28, 29; commodified, 36, 345; in Melville, 238; and Jameson, 298; in Spahr, 328, 330, 331; and disgust, 335­336; and tolerance, 341­342; and market, 342, 348­349. See Fear Theory/criticism: feminist, 8, 138­139, 144; formalist, 47; contemporary, 271; and capitalism, 299­300; and paranoia, 301; and poetry, 304; and language, 306, 307; and avant-garde, 307, 308, 309, 310, 314, 401n22; and art, 314; and repulsion vs. See also Confidence Twoness, 153, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160 Ugly feelings, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11­12, 22, 24, 26, 27, 51, 265, 335 Understanding, 228­229, 231 Uniformity, 93 Uplift, 177, 179, 200, 247, 268 Van Vechten, Carl, Nigger Heaven, 178, 181, 204­205 Ventriloquism, 92, 97, 98, 114 Vertigo, 215, 216, 237, 238, 242, 243 Vertigo (Hitchcock), 8, 143 Viewer. See also Aggression Virno, Paolo, 4­5 Voice, 42, 92, 93, 99, 113, 114, 123, 124 Wald, Priscilla, 238, 239 Wall Street, 333 Ward, Diane, "Imaginary Movie," 305, 315, 323 Warhol, Andy, 262, 278, 287, 288 Warminski, Andrzej, 166 Waters, John, 332 Watson, Ben, 268 Welcome Back Kotter (television series), 107 Weltanschauung, 47, 48 Wentworth, John, 58 West, Nathanael, Day of the Locust, 249, 250, 252, 254, 257 White, Armond, 105, 106­107 Whites, 178, 180, 182, 185, 186, 187­188, 192, 193, 196, 385n32, 387n33. See also Race Whitman, Walt, 351, 352 Wiegman, Robyn, 132, 134, 135, 137­138, 143, 164, 207, 330 Wilder, Billy, Double Indemnity, 12­13, 14­ 17, 19 Williams, Raymond, 25, 26 Will Vinton Studios, 103 Wimsatt, William K.

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